The holy grail for brands and publishers: connecting data without actually sharing data 

May 2, 2022  |   Tim Geenen

A version of this article was published in PerformanceIN

 

Alongside the tech giants removing identifiers and deprecating cookies, other key challenges lie on the horizon for marketers. For one, as engagement has become increasingly diversified across channels and geographies, customer data fragmentation, and its potential for disrupting omnichannel brand experiences, needs to be carefully considered.  

 

It is therefore not surprising that, according to the AOP’s recent Digital Publishing: Meeting the Future Report 2022, developing first-party data strategies is going to remain at the top of the agenda for publishers in the months ahead. 

 

Whilst this is incredibly positive for the industry, it still requires action from brands and publishers, who need to be transacting on high-quality, first-party data if advertisers are to be provided with the tools necessary to conduct targeted digital campaigns.

 

This is no small order. Maintaining data privacy across transactions at the scale required by publishers and brands is difficult. Indeed, many brands simply don’t have the infrastructures in place for compliant data collaboration, and this would have to be watertight to prevent another damaging loss of trust in the industry. So, how can brands and publishers protect their revenue, improve their user experiences and rebuild their relationships with consumers, while having a truly privacy-first approach?

 

The answer lies in a prioritisation of the individual’s privacy as the crux of the digital ecosystem, bringing brands and publishers closer to the user and to one another. This means leveraging authenticated first-party data strategies that rely on identifiers tied to identity, rather than those that rely on devices or other characteristics which fail to cross all platforms. 

 

Identity refers to all the interaction points a consumer has with a business, like point-of-sale, web, customer service or billing. A strong identity strategy will unite these interactions, and provide advertisers with the high-value, addressable data that they require. An important part of this process is the value exchange, which is conducted through authentication. This refers to any time a user provides their personal information to a media owner or publisher, like their email address. Authentication is also important because it gives control to the user over their preferences, and makes the exchange of information for value as transparent as possible.

 

By transacting on shared people-based identifiers, but not consumers’ actual personal information, publishers are able to maintain full control of the information, maintaining consumers’ security and privacy. Meanwhile, advertisers are able to transact on these identifiers, benefiting from people-based addressable buys and reaching high-value target audiences, without needing to take on stewardship of this sensitive data.

 

By doing this, publishers are able to maintain full control of the information, maintaining consumers’ security and privacy. Advertisers, on the other hand, are able to transact on these identifiers, benefiting from people-based addressable buys and reaching high-value target audiences, without needing to take on stewardship of this sensitive data.

 

While publishers and brands may be thinking of addressability in conjunction with the deprecation of third-party cookies and other identifiers, it needs to be highlighted that new addressable solutions, such as our own – Authenticated Traffic Solution (ATS) –  already outperform cookies. In fact, over 1,000 publishers and distribution partners have already integrated with ATS, along with over 400 of the world’s leading advertisers who can now activate campaigns leveraging authenticated inventory. 

 

Ultimately, this enables both parties to benefit from the increased measurement potential and visibility that people-based identifiers enable across all platforms. A win-win for all involved.